Specialty Recognition

Summary Protocol

1) A third party independent body, Canadian National Dental Specialty Recognition Commission (Committee), is created in order to review applications for national dental specialty recognition with sole discretion to receive, review and decide national specialist applications. The CDRAF Board’s responsibility would be to ensure that the correct process is followed. The composition of the Committee would consist of:

  • Two representatives of the Commission on Dental Accreditation of Canada (CDAC)
  • Two representatives from the Royal College of Dentists of Canada (RCDC)
  • Two representatives from the Canadian Dental Association (CDA/1 general/1 specialist)
  • Three representatives from the Canadian Dental Regulatory Authorities Federation (CDRAF/Registrars and/or elected members)
  • Two representatives of the Association of the Canadian Faculties of Dentistry (ACFD/educational)

This is not a standing committee. As the need arises, the Committee would be struck.

2) The application fee must be self-sustaining and is initially set at $5,000.00.

Any group making application needs to do so in such a way that the funding of the Committee would be sustaining and any application fee include a $5,000.00 application fee, payable to the Canadian Dental Regulatory Authorities Federation.

3) The criteria include:

i) Sponsoring Organization
In order for an area to be recognized as a specialty it must be represented by a sponsoring organization:
(a )whose practice is reflective of the special area of dental practice,
(b) that demonstrates the ability to establish a certifying board,
(c) has an adequate infrastructure to sustain the specialty,(d) specializes in an area of dentistry that is demonstratively contributing to substantial improvements in the standards of dental practice.

Therefore, in order for an area to be recognized as a dental specialty, it must be restricted and represented by a sponsoring organization whose membership is national and reflective of the special area of dental practice.

ii) Body of Knowledge
A proposed specialty is a well defined and legitimate area of dental practice requiring advanced knowledge and skills beyond those possessed by a dental school graduate as defined by pre-doctoral accreditation standards with a sustainable base in the dental profession.

iii) Relationship of Scope
Relationship of scope of proposed specialty to existing specialties

(a) The scope of the proposed specialty requires advanced knowledge and skills that:

a) Are separate and distinct from any recognized dental specialty or combination of specialties.
b) Cannot be recognized through minimal modification of a recognized dental specialty or combination of specialties.
c) Specializing in an area of dentistry is demonstrably contributing to substantial improvements in the quality and safety of health care.

iv) Need and Value of Proposed Specialty
The specialty application must document, specifically, a valid and reliable statistical evidence/studies that it:
(a) Actively contributes to knowledge in the field.
(b) Actively contributes to professional education.
(c) Actively contributes to the research need of the profession.
(d) Provides oral health services for the public all of which are currently not generally being offered by general practitioners or dental specialists.

v) Provision of Dental Health Services to the Public Recommendations
A proposed specialty must directly benefit some aspect of clinical dental patient care.

vi) Advanced Education
Formal advanced education programs of at least two years beyond pre-doctoral curriculum must exist to provide the special knowledge and skills required for practice of the specialty.

The creation of the Committee for National Dental Specialty Recognition was approved by the CDRAF Board unanimously and by every province in attendance on Thursday, October 20, 2011.

Dated October 20, 2011